News you may have missed #831 (Boston Marathon bombings)

Site of one of the Boston Marathon blastsBy IAN ALLEN | intelNews.org |
►►Russia had warned FBI Tsarnaev had radical links. The Russian FSB intelligence security service shared with the FBI in early 2011 information that Tamerlan Tsarnaev, one of the brothers suspected in the Boston marathon bombings, was a follower of radical Islam. The Russians allegedly told the FBI that Tsarnaev, 26,  had changed drastically since 2010 as he prepared to leave the US to join unspecified underground groups.
►►FBI interviewed dead Boston bombing suspect years ago. The FBI admitted Friday they interviewed the now-deceased Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev two years ago but failed to find any incriminating information about him. The FBI probe culminated in a sit-down interview where they probably asked him a lot of questions about his life, his contacts, his surroundings. All of this was then written in a report.
►►Ex-CIA/FBI official says Boston bombings were not terrorism. Counterterrorism expert Philip Mudd, with experience in the CIA and the FBI, told Fox News: “What I fear is that people too quickly categorize this as terrorism. This looks more to me like Columbine than it does like al Qaeda. Two kids who radicalized between themselves in a closed circle and go out and commit murder. I would charge these guys as murderers, not terrorists”.
►►Ex-US Attorney General says Boston bombings were terrorism. Michael Mukasey, Attorney General of the United States from 2007 to 2009, says that the Boston attack “was obviously a suicide operation –not in the direct way of a bomber who kills all his victims and himself at the same time by blowing himself up, but in the way of someone who conducts a spree, holding the stage for as long as possible, before he is cut down in a blaze of what he believes is glory. Here, think Mumbai”.

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9 Responses to News you may have missed #831 (Boston Marathon bombings)

  1. Pete says:

    Re the first story on the Russian Federal Security Bureau (FSB) warning the FBI that Tamerlan had “drastically changed” while he was in the US.

    It of course brings up the spectre that the Russians were monitoring Tamerlan by some means while he was in America.

    Most obvious is Russian monitoring of Tamerlan’s internet activities.

    Or perhaps the Russian monitoring also took a more active form – that is Russian “diplomats” in the US or there helpers monitoring Tamerlan in more immediate ways.

  2. TFH says:

    The IRA was allegedly allowed to do fundraising in USA (NORAID, Friends of Sinn Féin) and they were attacking the closest ally of USA. Wonder if the decision to not keep an eye on Tsarnaev despite voiced concerns of the Russian intelligence services was because he was considered Russia’s potential problem and not USA’s.

  3. David says:

    Season 7 Episode 1 of MI-5.

  4. Stuart Mill says:

    Once again we see confusion about terminology, criminal vs. terror. In addition to the fact that local prosecutors and state lawmakers benefit from the word “terror” in front of juries and judges (as in “making terroristic threats,” etc.), counter-terrorism officials will always benefit from characterizing events as “criminal,” because they could or should have been prevented by an entirely different branch of law enforcement. Because there is accountability at stake, I fear that permanent definitions of terror will become more elusive not less. The origin of the word Terror suggests that the effect should be considered above all: panic, which certainly applied in the Boston case.

    Counterterrorism expert Philip Mudd, with experience in the CIA and the FBI, told Fox News: “What I fear is that people too quickly categorize this as terrorism. This looks more to me like Columbine than it does like al Qaeda. Two kids who radicalized between themselves in a closed circle and go out and commit murder. I would charge these guys as murderers, not terrorists”.

  5. DJ says:

    If it’s not terrorism, and I’m would hesitate to characterize it otherwise, the Feds lose jurisdiction. They may lose it anyway if the international connections don’t pan out, but I don’t think that they *want* to lose it.

  6. mopsie says:

    i wonder if russia doesnt automatically seek info on any chechen requesting a visa to russia. they never responded when the US asked for what they had turned up which makes me think that they didnt have much of anything. were the russians watching him when he was there?
    it fits MY 2 requirements of a terrorism label b/c it was a CIVILIAN population that was attacked, and i am assuming that, in their minds, there was a POLITICAL rationalization. what bothers me most is the way it fires up anti-muslim sentiment in the US, which, judging from people’s comments in US media, is already at a fevered pitch. the anti-muslim feeling will generate more support for US activities in muslim countries, which will generate more anti-american feeling there and among some US muslims, which could generate future terrorist attacks. i think the US should go and annoy NK and the chinese for a while because the religious hatred sounds like nazi germany to me.

  7. Pete says:

    The FBI has now provided information responding to those interested in Russian interception to/from America. My April 22 comment at the beginning of this string: “It of course brings up the spectre that the Russians were monitoring Tamerlan by some means while he was in America”

    The FBI now indicate http://www.businessinsider.com/russia-had-wiretap-on-boston-bombing-suspect-in-2011-2013-4?IR=T :

    “WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials say Russian authorities secretly recorded a conversation in 2011 in which one of the Boston bombing suspects vaguely discussed jihad with his mother.

    …The conversations are significant because, had they been revealed earlier, there might have been enough evidence for the FBI to initiate a more thorough investigation of the Boston bombing suspects’ family”

  8. DJ says:

    I will guess, though the article does not specify, that the first conversation was intercepted while the suspect was actually in Russia, as was the other conversation they overheard. It would be interesting if the FSB though he was important enough to monitor while he was in the U.S. I will also guess that these telephone conversations were the “stuff” that Russia advised the U.S. of in their initial warning about Tamarlane and this is just a C.Y.A move on the Bureau’s part to say, “if we’d only known this then.” I’m sure they did, but it wasn’t enough to be actionable.

  9. Pete says:

    @DJ

    Maybe, but alternatively, maybe not :)

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