News you may have missed #0178

Bookmark and Share

News you may have missed #0127

  • Is China using Nepal as a base to spy on India? India’s Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) has accused Beijing of using the so-called Nepal-China study centers in Nepal to spy on India. The centers, which are located all along the Indo-Nepal border, are being used to clandestinely gather information on Indian activities, says RAW. It also rumored that RAW is monitoring around 30 Chinese firms which have set up base in Nepal and may be involved in spying on India.
  • Italian lawyers seek jail for CIA agents. Public prosecutors in Italy have urged a court in Milan to jail 26 Americans for the kidnapping of a terrorism suspect in a 2003 CIA operation on Italian soil. They also want a 13 year prison sentence for the former head of Italy’s secret service, Nicolo Pollari. Last week the US government moved for the first time to officially prevent Italian authorities from prosecuting American citizens involved in the CIA operation.
  • CIA director meets Pakistani spy chief. The director of Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) Ahmed Shuja Pasha, has met with CIA director Leon Panetta in Washington. Last week, Lieutenant General Pasha yelled at a US journalist for daring to utter the CIA’s allegations that the ISI is withholding crucial intelligence information on al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

Bookmark and Share

Analysis: Pakistan’s former spy chief sees wider geopolitical games in region

Hamid Gul

Hamid Gul

Lieutenant General Hamid Gul, the controversial former Director General of Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), has expressed the view that Pakistan’s nuclear disarmament is the ultimate aim of the US-Indian alliance. Speaking to reporters in Islamabad, Gul said India’s insistence on charging the ISI with complicity in the 2008 Mumbai attack is “part of a greater conspiracy to discredit the body for being an extension of the Pakistan Army” and eventually questioning the latter’s role as guardian of the country’s nuclear arsenal. “Once the Army and the ISI are demolished [the US and India] will reach out to our nuclear capability saying it is not is safe hands”, said the retired Lieutenant General. In discussing the increasing military and political collaboration between the US and India, Gul noted that “the Americans and Israel [are] hell-bent that India should be given pre-eminence in the region”, acting as the dominant regional power. He described such a scenario as essentially positioning India to the role of overseer of “60 per cent of the world’s trade [which] passes through the Indian Ocean”, including transport routes of “Gulf oil, bound for China and Japan, [which] will be under the shadow of India’s sole nuclear power”. Read more of this post

Hi-tech Mumbai attacks pose forensics problems for intel agencies

The barriers to government-authorized communications interception posed by the increasing use of Internet-based communications systems by militants or criminals are nothing new. Intelligence and law enforcement agencies have been struggling with this issue since the late 1990s, when audio-enabled instant messenger services began to rise in popularity. In 2005, a brief report in Time magazine correctly described Internet-based audio communications as a “massive technological blind spot” troubling FBI wiretap experts. It has now emerged that last month the Pakistani militant group, Lashkar-e-Taiba, used voice-over-Internet-protocol (VOIP) software to communicate with the Mumbai attackers on the ground and direct the large scale operation on a real-time basis. Read more of this post

INDIAN POLICE ARREST INTELLIGENCE AGENT BY MISTAKE

On December 1, we reported that accusing Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency of complicity in the recent militant attack of selected targets in Mumbai overlooks the responsibility of Indian intelligence agencies to prevent such attacks. We [^1] specifically pointed to revelations in Indian newspapers that “clear warnings of a coming assault were ignored” by local police forces and “that Indian intelligence agencies had precise information at least 10 months ago that Pakistani militants were planning an attack” but failed to act. It now appears that the infamous operational disconnect between Indian intelligence and police agencies has resulted in the arrest of an actual Indian undercover agent in connection with the Mumbai attacks. Specifically, last weekend the Calcutta police arrested two Indians who had used false identities to purchase 22 subscriber identity module (SIM) cards later used by militants who participated in the Mumbai attacks.

One of the arrestees is Mukhtar Ahmed, an Indian from Jammu Kashmir. It later emerged that Ahmed was in fact an Indian counterintelligence agent working on a “long-term [infiltration] mission with police in Indian-administered Kashmir”. Among his tasks was procuring “SIM cards for Lashkar-e-Taiba [^1] fighters and pass the numbers to police so that all calls from those numbers could be monitored by intelligence”. Unnamed senior Indian counterintelligence sources say that Ahmed’s arrest has blown “a high-value asset” and that Ahmed’s family is now “at risk”. Indian counterintelligence officials are further frustrated by the release of Ahmed’s name by the Calcutta police, even though local police officials had been told “categorically to keep shut on the entire Mumbai investigations”. It appears that Calcutta officials believed they had a “huge catch and [simply] wanted publicity”. [IA]

New
New
RSS Feed
icon_new

Ian La Razon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About intelNews 2

About J and I 2

Press Room 2

Media Inquiries

ACI Indexed Blog 2

Social Networking 2

In Partnership With 2

CIA alerted Indian intelligence about pending attacks

On December 1, 2008, we suggested that simply blaming Pakistani intelligence agencies for the recent Mumbai attacks “overlooks the responsibility of Indian intelligence agencies to prevent such attacks by militants”. We cited recent revelations in Indian newspapers that “clear warnings of a coming assault were ignored” and “that Indian intelligence agencies had precise information at least 10 months ago that Pakistani militants were planning an attack”, but failed to act. Indian newspaper The Hindu is now revealing that there were at least two occasions on which the CIA delivered to India’s Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) “warnings of an impending terror attack on Mumbai”. Read more of this post

Comment: India’s intelligence, police force part of the problem

It is fine to accuse the Pakistani Army and Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency of complicity in the recent attack by a small army of selected targets in Mumbai, but this overlooks the responsibility of Indian intelligence agencies to prevent such attacks by militants. Those who criticize the ISI are ignoring the recent revelations in Indian newspapers that “clear warnings of a coming assault were ignored” and “that Indian intelligence agencies had precise information at least 10 months ago that Pakistani militants were planning an attack” but failed to act. Read more of this post