Mossad officer who saved Hamas leader’s life appeals for moderation

Mishka Ben DavidBy IAN ALLEN | intelNews.org
An Israeli intelligence operative, who in 1997 saved the life of the leader of Palestinian militant group Hamas, has published a letter calling on Hamas to show moderation in the dispute with Israel. In 1997, Benjamin Netanyahu, who, like today, was Israel’s prime minister, authorized an ambitious operation to assassinate the leader of Hamas, Khaled Mashal. The operation was carried out by the Mossad, Israel’s covert-action agency, which sent several of its members to Jordanian capital Amman, where Mashal was living at the time. On September 25, two Mossad assassins were waiting for Mashal to arrive at his office, ready to dispense a fast-acting poison in the form of an injection. But as the Hamas leader entered the premises, his young daughter called his name, causing him to turn his head in the opposite direction. As a result, the needle with the deadly poison landed on his ear, as opposed to his neck, and much of it was spilled. Mashal started yelling and before too long the two Mossad assassins had been captured alive by Hamas security guards. Mashal was then rushed to hospital and was about to die, when a furious King Hussein of Jordan contacted Tel Aviv with an ultimatum: either an antidote would be provided to save Mashal’s life, or the captured Mossad agents would be speedily tried and most likely sentenced to death by execution. The director of the Mossad operation then contacted a support officer, Mishka Ben-David, who was awaiting orders in an Amman hotel, and asked him to deliver a vial of antidote to a Jordanian security officer who would be waiting at the lobby of the hotel later that evening. Ben-David did as he was told and handed to the Jordanians the vial of antidote, which the Mossad had prepared in case one of their operatives was inadvertently injected with the poison. The antidote saved Mashal’s life and enabled him to continue to lead Hamas, the organization that is now in command of the Gaza Strip. Last week, Ben-David published an open letter addressed to Mashal, the man whose life he once saved, in which he calls on the Hamas strongman to stop taking his cues from “the most extreme side” of his organization. In a subsequent interview with British newspaper The Sunday Telegraph, Ben-David said his intention in authoring the letter was to “appeal to the rational side of Khaled Mashal”, and urge him to “accept a compromise” in order to “end the war with Israel”. Ben-David was also critical of Israel, saying that some of its actions in Gaza were “damaging the country’s standing”. But he predicted that sooner or later the more moderate wings of Hamas will predominate over Mashal, and “put forward another position, which will be softer than his”. When asked by The Telegraph whether Israel would try to kill Mashal again, he responded that “if the prime minister [of Israel] decides to kill him, it will happen”, even though Mashal currently lives in Doha under the protection of the Qatari regime. “For the Mossad I don’t think there is a ‘mission impossible’”, said Ben-David.

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2 Responses to Mossad officer who saved Hamas leader’s life appeals for moderation

  1. Very interesting article. Once Mishka Ben David resigned from the Mossad he became a full time writer of fiction. I have just finished reading his first novel, published in English this past year, entitled Duet in Beirut. Part of the plot is this particular assassination (target has a different name), the failure dependent on the sudden appearance of the targets daughter. From then fiction moves on. Interesting novel.

  2. Mr pil says:

    I don’t see how he can claim to have saved his life? He just followed order’s to save his colleagues hides.

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