Espionage scandal prompts resignations of top Swiss banking executives

Credit SuisseTwo senior executives of Credit Suisse, one of the world’s most powerful banking firms, have resigned amidst a high-stakes espionage scandal that may have prompted a suicide and has shocked Switzerland. The alleged target of the espionage is Iqbal Khan, the former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Credit Suisse’s wealth-management division. The 43-year-old Khan moved to Switzerland from his native Pakistan at the age of 12. In 2013, after working for more than a decade as an auditor at Ernst & Young, he joined Credit Suisse. He quickly rose to head the institution’s wealth-management division and was credited with having nearly doubled its profits between 2016 and 2018.

Khan’s meteoric success brought him immense financial wealth. He soon bought a piece of property that is adjacent to the home of Tidjane Thiam, the 57-year-old CEO of Credit Suisse. Khan and his wife had the house on their property demolished and began a two-year project to build a new house. But the disruption caused by the large-scale construction project gave rise to a dispute between Thiam and Khan. Their rivalry escalated quickly and prompted the intervention of Credit Suisse board chairman Urs Rohner. However, the dispute between the two men was not resolved, and on July 1 of this year Khan left Credit Suisse. On August 29, Credit Suisse’s rival UBS announced that Khan would co-lead its global wealth management division.

It appears that some Credit Suisse executives were concerned that Khan might try to attract their firm’s customers to his new UBS portfolio. These concerns allegedly prompted Credit Suisse’s Chief Operating Officer (COO), Pierre-Olivier Bouee, to instruct the bank’s security department to keep tabs on Khan. The bank reportedly hired a private investigation firm, Investigo, to monitor Khan’s movements. There was an unexpected turn on September 17, when Khan noticed that he was being followed and promptly confronted an Investigo employee in downtown Zurich. On the same day, the former Credit Suisse star manager filed a complaint with the Zurich office of the Swiss Public Prosecutor.

On September 18, Credit Suisse gave orders to Investigo to stop keeping tabs on Khan. It also launched an internal investigation to evaluate the merits of the decision to spy on Khan. Meanwhile, the Swiss Public Prosecutor’s office announced that it had opened a criminal case on Investigo and had arrested three individuals in connection with the case. On September 24, a private investigator, who is believed to have been involved in Khan’s case, committed suicide. Media reports said the unidentified man was “an external security expert” who mediated between Credit Suisse and Investigo.

On Tuesday, Credit Suisse COO Bouee announced his resignation. Swiss media said the head of the bank’s global security division also resigned. Also on Tuesday, Credit Suisse’s internal investigation found that CEO Thiam had not been involved in the decision to spy on Khan.

Author: Joseph Fitsanakis | Date: 02 October 2019 | Permalink

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Analysis: The security implications of the Panama Papers

First Post HAside from their immediate shock value, the Panama Papers reveal the enormous extent of tax evasion on a worldwide scale. This unprecedented phenomenon is inextricably tied with broader trends in globalized finance-capitalism that directly threaten the very survival of the postwar welfare state. National intelligence agencies must begin to view offshore tax evasion as an existential threat to the security of organized government and need to augment their economic role as part of their overall mission to protect and secure law-abiding citizens.

THE BACKGROUND OF THE LEAK

The source of the Panama Papers leak —the largest in history— is apparently a single individual who contacted the widely respected German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung over a year ago. After receiving assurances that his or her anonymity would be safeguarded, the source proceeded to provide the paper with what eventually amounted to over 11.5 million files. They include company emails, banking transaction records, and files of clients that span the years 1977 to 2015. The source asked for no financial compensation or other form of reimbursement in return, saying only that he or she wanted to “make these crimes public”.

Faced with the largest data leak in recorded history, the Süddeutsche Zeitung reporters contacted the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), which is the international arm of the Washington-based Center for Public Integrity. With ICIJ acting as an umbrella group, the German reporters were eventually joined by 370 journalists representing 100 news outlets from 76 Q Quotecountries. On Sunday, following a year-long analysis of the data, the reporting partners began publishing revelations from the Panama Papers, and say they will continue to do so for several days to come.

THE ROLE OF MOSSACK FONSECA

The documents are from the internal records of Mossack Fonseca, a law firm headquartered in Panama City, Panama, with offices in 42 countries. The company is one of the world’s most prolific registrars and administrators of shell companies in offshore locations. It has created more than 300,000 shell companies throughout its history, most of them in offshore tax havens like the British Virgin Islands, Cyprus, or Guernsey. Its clients are offered the ability to incorporate a generic-sounding company and headquarter it in an offshore tax haven. In exchange for an annual fee, Mossack Fonseca provides the company with a sham director and shareholders, thus concealing the true owner and actual beneficiary of the business.

The power of the leaked documents is that they reveal the actual owners of 214,000 offshore shell companies managed by Mossack Fonseca. The long list of names includes dozens of current and former heads of state, as well as hundreds of politicians, public figures and celebrities. Many of these individuals have failed to declare their earnings from their shell companies in their annual tax Q Quotestatements, which means they have not been paying taxes in their country of citizenship or residency. Thus, there are now thousands of Mossack Fonseca clients in over 100 countries who are preparing to face the legal consequences of tax evasion.

SECURITY IMPLICATIONS

Equally importantly, however, the leaked documents reveal that Mossack Fonseca’s clients appear to include at least 33 individuals and companies that are involved in organized crime or have close contacts with terrorist organizations. This sheds light on the increasingly disappearing line that once separated illicit activities such as tax avoidance and tax evasion, from money laundering, organized crime and terrorism. This phenomenon is assisted by unscrupulous companies like Mossack Fonseca, which act as anonymizing platforms for wealthy celebrities, criminals and terrorists alike.

The leak also shows the extent to which national governments have been unable to stem the tide of unfettered finance-capitalism, which today threatens the stability and cohesion of developed and developing economies alike. Moreover, the sheer scale of offshore capital funds, which, according to one expert, amount to as much as $32 trillion, threaten the economic security of nation states and must be viewed as an existential threat to the ability of states to fund public expenditures though taxation. The political arrangement that led to the creation of the postwar welfare state is today being directly threatened by the inability or unwillingness of organized states to monitor the largely unregulated flow of capital to offshore tax havens.

Today, entire economies, including much of southern Europe, the Balkans, as well as Latin America, are crumbling under the fiscal weight created by mass-scale tax evasion and organized crime. Organized criminals are now actively working closely with the banking sector, thus creating even more opportunities for money laundering and other financial illegality on an unprecedented scale. The Süddeutsche Zeitung revelations demonstrate that the line that separates legitimate economic activity from the rogue underbelly of global capitalism is exceedingly thin. It is high time that Western intelligence agencies viewed this worrying development as an asymmetrical threat against the security of law-abiding societies and began dealing with offshore tax havens with the same intensity that they have displayed against terrorist safe havens since 9/11.

Author: Joseph Fitsanakis | Date: 04 April 2016 | Permalink